Memoirs Of A Mardi Gras Virgin

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Writing about the French Quarter has turned out to be a difficult and confusing task. My mind spins and twirls with facts, history, myths, legends, ghosts, tours, food and more. There is a plethora of architecture to enchant the mind and leave the soul spellbound. Do I start on the atmosphere and smell of the Quarter which is unlike any location I have ever experienced or talk about the wall to wall of ladies, young and old that are everywhere having a good time.

The one place that all have to go if they want to truly experience the ambiance of New Orleans is hands down, the Oceana just off Bourbon Street. This restaurant exuberates all that is New Orleans and Cajun food. The prices are inexpensive and the service is first rated. The traditional Creole dishes, oysters, seafood, and for those who don’t like swamp roaches like myself, the Cajun Chicken Poor Boy. With cuisine for even the pickiest of eaters it is a great stop.

While you are there don’t forget to get one of their world class drinks, “The Hurricane”. Yeah, I realize you can have tequila, beer, rum or a combination of thousands of other drinks, but live a little and drink what the area is known for. Ah, Bourbon Street. This is the place where the young tout signs reading “Thank you for pot smoking”, and the overzealous bible-pushers on megaphones pronounce your death and banishment to hell.

This is where families with children can be entertained during early hours, but where adults will play when the young ones are asleep.

People start going to the French Quarter and the balconies to drink, eat and throw beads. In my case, we didn’t have a balcony and everything started pretty early. Most of my activity here was spent at dusk, after 8pm. Beads of all kinds; penis-shaped, dice-shaped, Coca-cola beads, beads with jesters, BIG BALLED BEADS, all littered the streets and the necks of males and females alike.

Beads are thrown to individuals in appreciation of anything from acknowledgment of a neat costume to the exchange for a flash of tits, butt, or vagina. Beads can also be traded for kisses, butt-grabs, or other more creative things.

It was a bit chilly, at least for me. But we were having so much fun I had to endure. I was there with a friend and my cousin and we were having a blast. We had fun just watching people and seeing the diversity on the street.

Everyone was friendly, from the bartenders to our fellow party-goers on the street. Strangers gave us useful advice like how it’s better to pay to use the bathroom as opposed to just pissing on a side street. We witnessed a few men going to jail that didn’t want to pay and were caught pissing on a side street, Ha, Ha! Even one lady taught me the “motorboat,” placing my head into her breasts and swinging side to side while I closed my lips making a buzzing sound!

Mardi Gras is music, parades, picnics, floats, excitement, parties, costumes, beautiful ladies and one big holiday in New Orleans! Everyone is wearing purple, green and gold and adorned with long beads some with clothes on and some with no clothes, but beautiful nonetheless.

Everyone needs to experience Mardi Gras once, if not for the fun in the evening on Bourbon Street, then for the food and the town…. I was lucky enough to be exposed to, and for a short time, become a part of a different culture and age old tradition…. And I can’t wait to go back!


 

Memories of a first time visit to Mardi Gras

 

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Author:Partyclique.com

Partyclique.com is a documentary on bars, pubs, clubs, parties, events, festivals, nightlife and entertainment around the world. Think of it as a megacity with many neighborhoods, shops, thoroughfares, bridges, streets and alleys. Each time you click a link you'll be connected to and experience the flavor of a different culture from somewhere on the planet. This best part of it all is that the closer you look, the more you'll come to discover. Partyclique.com was founded and based in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. but is interactively connected to the world.

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